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Thread: my daschund cannot move his back legs

  1. #1
    sundrop Guest

    Post my daschund cannot move his back legs

    My 5 yr old male daschund cannot move his back legs. He was fine, playful, and active three days ago, then for two days he had difficulty climbing stairs, then he just could not move his hind legs. He has been treated with steroid injections x 2 by a local vet. He has not had x-rays. The vet did not mention doing any. He is not better. Surgery was mentioned by the vet, who says he will refer us to a university animal hospital. Any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I would say get him to the teaching hospital ASAP. If surgery is required it will not be without it's risk and it will be expensive. I don't want to scare you but when I lost my little girl to complications after surgery I was told before surgery that the more rapid the onset of symptoms the more critical time was to a good prognosis for the surgery. You will need to be aware of possible complications such as loss of bladder control where you may have to learn to express their bladder this can last any where form days to for life or it may not be required at all. There are no guarantees with surgery. In this area at our VTH the cost range I was told to expect was any place form a low of $1,500 to a high in the $2,500-2,700 range. If you choose not to do surgery either due to the cost or for other reasons no one should hold it against you. You and the vets you work with are the only ones who can judge your companions quality of life and the possible benefit vs risk of the various treatment options.

    Good luck,

    Tom
    Tom and Tanner, Gretel and angels (Aggie, Frank and Dexter)

    "He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion"
    - Unknown

  3. #3
    Wotan, Shakti & Gaudi Inc Guest

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    Please take your doxie to that university hospital ASAP. It's VERY important! He needs to be seen right away. The best place IMO is a university vet hospital as they are up on all the latest vet techniques and equipment. They will tell you if your doxie needs surgery or not. I did have a doxie who was paralyzed and I took him to a university vet clinic and then cured him with just total crate rest and hydrotherapy but some doxies need surgery. The MOST important thing is to get him into that university vet clinic TODAY please!

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    I'll add my voice to the others. We who have Dachsies that have battled IDD know that speed is of the essence to give them the chance they need for recovery. The sooner the better!

    Mark
    Mark and Jean

    Caleigh (7/27/2012) and Dusty (7/25/2012)




    Forever in our hearts
         Beloved Wimpy (1/21/1990 - 11/27/2002)
         Sweet Susie (12/4/1991 - 10/31/2008)
         Bold Brutus (1/9/1995 - 4/23/2010)
         Beautiful Debbie (11/9/98 - 9/21/2012)
         Soulful Star (5/8/99 - 10/30/2012)
         Precious Tiny (4/15/94 -11/27/2012)

  5. #5
    Tanya Guest

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    My dachsie also went down. The University hospital is best where experts in this area can treat your dachshie. Regular vets just don't usually have the experience dealing with dachsie backs. Usually if surgery is needed you have a better prognosis if the surgery is done quickly. The prognosis for recovery decreases when the dachsie loses deep pain. (That doesn't mean he won't recover though.) As already stated, surgery is very expensive and does not always work. The specialist at the hospital will more than likely do some tests to determine if your dachsie is a good candidate for surgery. If surgery is not an option, know that many dachsies live full happy lives using a K-9 cart. My friend's dachsie doesn't seem to notice her legs don't work, she wheels around with the rest of the pack. So paralysis doesn't have to mean you lose your dachsie. Discuss this with your vet...of course we want your dachsie to have a good quality of life pain free. Good luck with your little guy and please keep us informed.
    Tanya

  6. #6
    sundrop Guest

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    Many thanks to all.
    Max has an appt with a specialist in the morning at 9:30 for a myelogram--a type of xray, I think. This was the first available appt. They will determine from the myelogram about whether surgery would be the best choice. He is still not moving, after three steroid injections, but he does wag his tail, and still has deep pain response.

  7. #7
    Owen's Mom Guest
    My friends did the Homeopathic approach when their little boy went down in the back. They opted for accupunture therapy, hydrotherapy and herbal remedies. He pulled through it like a trooper, you'd never know he went down.

    It's something to look into.

    Best of luck
    ~~Amy~~

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Amy, every case is different in cases where there is reason to believe that pieces of ruptured disk are pressing on directly on the spinal column and there is even the possibility of blood clots forming in the area (one of Aggie's complications) time is a critical factor any any delay trying out the Homeopathic approach could well cost the dog it's life. In the case of a severe rupture and fragmentation of the disk major pressure develops at the site of the injury. The spinal column itself can start to degenerate (always fatal). The steroid or Homeopathic approach can be good when the onset of symptoms is slow but in general when the symptoms develop rapidly it is more likely to be a major trauma and the best odds are if surgery is preformed within 12-24 hours. The odds get steadily worse with time. That is why it is critical that the animal gets to a VTH or other hospital with qualified neurological staff who can run test that most small vets are not equipped for. They will take a milogram (SP?) or even cat scan to see in more detail what is going on.

    As with any thing else there may be cases when surgery is recommended and not done and the animal recovers and there will be other cases where surgery is not recommended because recovery was expected without it and it may turn out the animal dies when it could have been saved. The key here is that the majority of the time the educated evulation of each case is correct and time delays when dealing with serious spinal injuries can be critical. A down dachshund can be the result of either minor or major injuries and we as lay people can not access the problem and make the proper decisions without professional guidance.

    I'm sorry if I sound like I'm preaching it's just that I will always have that nagging thought that if I had called my vet back in the evening when Aggie became totally paralyzed in the hind quarters instead of waiting till the next morning when we had a follow up appointment scheduled (less than 24 hours after she first became unstable on her feet) I'm sure they would have immediately sent me to the VTH and perhaps the 12-16 hours difference may have saved her life. I don't want others to feel that same self doubt.

    Tom
    Tom and Tanner, Gretel and angels (Aggie, Frank and Dexter)

    "He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion"
    - Unknown

  9. #9
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    Sundrop,

    The tail movement and deep pain response are good signs. Keep the faith we are pulling for you and your boy.

    Best wishes,

    Tom
    Tom and Tanner, Gretel and angels (Aggie, Frank and Dexter)

    "He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion"
    - Unknown

  10. #10
    Tanya Guest

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    Tom. I agree with all you have said. I can relate to how you feel as well. We too waited until the next morning to take Punkin in (our vets advice!) and by waiting she lost all movement & deep pain.

    Sundrop - it is wonderful that his tail is still wagging and he has deep pain sensation. The mylegram (sp) is the xray they use to determine how much damage is done and exactly where the damage is done. If surgery is done they will probably do fenestration of the surrounding disks to help prevent future ruptures. Punkin's disk literally exploded into her spine and waiting caused irreversible damage. I was later told by a specialist that he would not have recommended Punkin for surgery because the damage was too great. Always go to a specialist when your dachsie's back is concerned. You are on the right track and the tail and pain sensation are all positive signs. Good luck. Let us know how it goes!!
    Tanya

  11. #11
    sundrop Guest

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    Max had a myelogram this morning, and surgery this afternoon. The myelogram showed a herniated disk. When he got in, the vet found more damage than he expected, so it lessens the chance of full recovery. Now we just have to wait and see.

  12. #12
    Join Date
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    For now, keep the faith and hang in there. Duck Butter was completely paralyzed (back end) when her disk exploded, had the surgery and recovered completely. Hopefully Max will too.

    The range of motion and water therapy's were key to the recovery.

    Please keep us posted . . . we're right here with you!

    Mark
    Mark and Jean

    Caleigh (7/27/2012) and Dusty (7/25/2012)




    Forever in our hearts
         Beloved Wimpy (1/21/1990 - 11/27/2002)
         Sweet Susie (12/4/1991 - 10/31/2008)
         Bold Brutus (1/9/1995 - 4/23/2010)
         Beautiful Debbie (11/9/98 - 9/21/2012)
         Soulful Star (5/8/99 - 10/30/2012)
         Precious Tiny (4/15/94 -11/27/2012)

  13. #13
    Jennifer Guest

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    Betty, Oscar and I are sending lots of dachsie healing rays to Max. Please, Please keep us posted.

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    The boys are sending doxie rays to Max. I ask my little angle Aggie to keep a eye on him as well. We all hope he makes a full recovery. You might want to check out http://www.abledogs.net/ for another very good looking support group.

    Good luck,

    Tom, Frank and Tanner
    Tom and Tanner, Gretel and angels (Aggie, Frank and Dexter)

    "He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion"
    - Unknown

  15. #15
    sundrop Guest

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    Thanks once again to all. I am leaving in a little while to go to Max. It is about a 5-hour drive. I will get to bring him home tomorrow probably. He also had a fish hook lodged in his esophagus. The vet removed that while he was anesthetized. He loves fishing with my father. I have visited the able dogs site already. If necessary, we will get him a doggie wheelchair. I probably won't post again for a few days, but many many thanks for all your support.

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